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Center for Curriculum and Transfer Articulation
Introduction to Sociology
Course: SOC101

First Term: 2013 Spring
Lecture   3.0 Credit(s)   3.0 Period(s)   3.0 Load  
Course Type: Academic
Load Formula: S


Description: The systematic study of social behavior and human groups, particularly the influence of culture, socialization, social structure, stratification, social institutions, differentiation by region, race, ethnicity, sex/gender, age, class, and socio/cultural change upon people`s attitudes and behaviors.




MCCCD Official Course Competencies
1. Explain the role of the Sociology in contributing to the systematic understanding of social reality historically and comparatively. (I)
2. Explain the role of theory in building sociological knowledge by using the insights of sociology, sociological perspectives, the sociological imagination, and applying those orientations to an area of social reality. (I, II)
3. Explain the role of evidence in building sociological knowledge by describing the research process with appropriate research terminology. (III)
4. Identify and compare methodological approaches and be able to use basic statistical resources when analyzing social phenomena. Emphasis on analytical reasoning. (III)
5. Summarize the relationship between micro and macro levels of analysis. (IV)
6. Demonstrate analytical/critical thinking skills by explaining the inter-relatedness of foundational sociological concepts: culture, socialization, social structures, social institutions, social change and differentiations by race, ethnicity, sex/gender, age, social class, region (urban/rural). (IV, VI)
7. Explain the structural aspects of inequalities (stratification) by describing the significance of diversity in domestic and global context: emphasis on the intersections of region (urban-metropolitan-rural), culture, race, ethnicity, class, sex/gender, age. (V)
8. Assess the effects of socio-cultural change on individuals and social structures. (VII)
9. Propose strategies for engaging in a pluralistic society and participating in diverse world cultures. (V, VIII)
10. Identify a range of occupations that utilize sociological insights, perspectives and methodologies. (VIII)
 
MCCCD Official Course Outline
I. The discipline of Sociology: its role in contributing to our understanding of social reality
   A. Historical context - the emergence of the discipline, key contributors
   B. Sociology as a science
   C. Relationship to other disciplines
   D. Thinking sociologically, especially applying the sociological imagination
   E. Application to everyday life
II. Sociological Perspectives: the role of theory in building sociological knowledge
   A. Definitions: theory, critical and analytical reasoning
   B. Structural Functionalist
   C. Conflict
   D. Feminist
   E. Symbolic Interactionist
   F. Application to everyday life-thinking about social issues
III. Methodologies: the role of evidence in building sociological knowledge
   A. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies
   B. The research process
   C. Basic statistical and data resources
   D. Application to everyday life-interpreting empirical evidence
IV. Basic concepts and their fundamental theoretical interrelations
   A. The interrelatedness of macro and micro contexts in understanding social behavior
   B. The interrelatedness of culture, society, social structures, groups, social institutions
   C. The properties of social groups
   D. The reciprocal relationships between individuals and society
   E. The development of the "self" from a sociological perspective
   F. The relationship between socialization, social control mechanisms and judgments about social behavior (conformity, tolerance limits, deviance)
V. Stratification: the structural aspects of inequalities
   A. Historic and comparative stratification systems
   B. The significant variations within American society by region (urban-rural), culture, race, ethnicity, class, sex/gender, age
   C. The significance of diversity in domestic and global context.
   D. Strategies for engaging in a pluralistic society and participating in diverse world cultures
   E. Application to everyday life-thinking about social inequalities
VI. Social Institutions
   A. Families
   B. Education
   C. Religion
   D. Economy and work
   E. Government and politics
   F. Health and medicine
VII. Social change
   A. Explanations for social change
   B. The etiology of collective behavior
   C. Historic and comparative social movements
   D. The effects of socio-cultural change on individuals and social structures
   E. Application to everyday life-thinking about social sustainability
VIII. "Doing Sociology in Everyday Life"
   A. Strategies for civic engagement
   B. Careers in Sociology
 
MCCCD Governing Board Approval Date: December 11, 2012

All information published is subject to change without notice. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information presented, but based on the dynamic nature of the curricular process, course and program information is subject to change in order to reflect the most current information available.